Is the graduate transfer rule a good thing? It depends who you ask

The original NCAA rule, instituted in 2006, was intended to allow student-athletes to transfer and enroll in a graduate program not offered at their undergrad school. Of course, it also made those student-athletes who had graduated essentially free agents.

If it were up to some, there would be no graduate transfers.

The original NCAA rule, instituted in 2006, was intended to allow student-athletes to transfer and enroll in a graduate program not offered at their undergrad school.

Of course, it also made those student-athletes who had graduated essentially free agents. And from the beginning, there were coaches who did not like that.

Grant Teaff, who was executive director of the American Football Coaches Association in 2006, told reporters this back then: “Check the history. Prior to the NCAA, guys would make All-American at different schools. There were no eligibility rules, no transfer rules. It became big business to get guys to go from one school to another.”

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And Kentucky basketball coach John Calipari said this last year to The (Louisville) Courier Journal: “Playing right away (as a graduate transfer), I don’t think it’s good for the kids. Many of them leave the school, don’t even tell the coach. They text him and say, ‘I’m going.’ What? How about teaching them to be a man.

“You have coaches now that are holding kids back academically so they can’t graduate. Is that what we want? I mean, it’s real simple: It’s awful for mid-major coaches, for programs, and I don’t think it’s good for the kids. I really don’t.”

On the other hand, many coaches say a player who earns a degree deserves the right to transfer without the penalty of sitting out a year.

Seattle University men’s basketball coach Jim Hayford has heard the cheers and the jeers regarding graduate…

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